MEG in the Community 2018-2019

MEG recognizes the importance of regional cooperation and planning among a broad variety of community and stakeholder groups to ensure the sustainability of oil sands development. We strive to listen to all stakeholders in relation to our operations and work collaboratively to continue consultation and/or establish engagement processes with potentially affected parties. Our goal is to continue ongoing dialogue and develop processes where feedback from Indigenous communities and other stakeholders can be shared, understood and feasibly incorporated into project planning.

MEG complies with provincial government policies and guidelines and is also guided by the norms and history of existing long-term relationships. MEG seeks to learn about and respect community-specific processes and procedures to manage ongoing consultation with potentially affected communities and stakeholders. Provincial government policies and guidelines which govern some of MEG’s Indigenous consultation include: The Government of Alberta’s Policy on Consultation with First Nations on Land and Natural Resource Management, 2013; The Government of Alberta’s Guidelines on Consultation with First Nations on Land and Natural Resource Management, July 28, 2014; The Government of Alberta’s Policy on Consultation with Metis Settlements on Land and Natural Resource Management, 2015; and The Government of Alberta’s Guidelines on Consultation with Metis Settlements on Land and Natural Resource Management, 2016.

In 2018-2019 we acted on our commitment to maintain a flow of communication throughout the lifecycle of our projects by providing project information, participating in face-to-face update meetings and open houses, and supporting sharing of Indigenous community-led traditional land use and traditional ecological knowledge. We continued to support annual community consultation, cultural and social events, as well as training and other community investment initiatives.

MEG’s consultation scope encompassed 22 Indigenous communities in northeastern Alberta and five municipal districts in 2019. While MEG has worked with communities to address environmental topics of concern, there has also been a consistent interest and emphasis from communities on participation in the economic benefits of MEG’s developments. Our Supply Chain Management and Community Relations Teams work closely with nearby communities to learn about and engage with Indigenous and local businesses, both directly and through meetings with community economic representatives as well as attendance at trade shows hosted by Indigenous communities and businesses. MEG’s work in this regard is enhanced and supported in part by the continued employment of a full-time Community Relations Site Lead, stationed at the Christina Lake Regional Project, who can be contacted via our dedicated Community Relations email inbox: communityrelations@megenergy.com.

MEG’s contracting strategies are guided by established local contracting policies and supply chain processes designed to support community participation in our activities in a competitive and dynamic environment. MEG is maintaining our emphasis on the use of Indigenous businesses to fulfill ongoing work and has continued to work with communities throughout 2018-2019 in this regard.

MEG also worked in 2018-2019 with 11 Indigenous communities on Traditional Land Use Studies related to proposed activities, documenting and incorporating their feedback and jointly addressing issues raised as part of our project planning and lifecycle process. This means balancing competing requests from communities where there are overlapping areas of use or interest and finding complementary and multi-community collaborative solutions.